Tuesday, December 26, 2006

Time to visit Bermuda's Beauty

Imagine lush tropical gardens, shimmering pink sand beaches, azure blue seas and spectacular sunsets, and you have envisioned Bermuda! Among the hibiscus and oleander, on the shores of a picturesque natural harbor, the fantastic hotels in Bermuda offer an elegant tribute to the old world splendor that is Britian's oldest colonial Island. Take a dip in your choice of fresh or saltwater pools, frolic with the dolphins at dockyard, or take a carriage ride around the town. Bermuda holds dear the ideas of old fashioned courtesy, timeless quality and genuine hospitality.

Sink your toes in the island's lush acres of pink sandy beaches and bountiful gardens. Relax beneath a rainbow of umbrellas at the beach or hit the links for a round of golf, grab your racket for a tennis match, snorkel your way around the reefs, ride the waves on a jet ski, explore the island on your scooter and enjoy great cuisine with their famous seafood. Don't forget to watch an endless game of Cricket!

Once you throw on your Bermuda shorts, you'll never want for things to do once you've arrived in Bermuda. For some great hotel offers go to www.trips2fun.net. See you on the beach!

Wednesday, November 22, 2006

Cannes is a Festival of Light and Color

Traveling to France can be charming especially if Cannes is on your itinerary. From Atlanta you fly now directly to Nice which is just a 1/2 hour by bus to Cannes. Along the route the unbelievably blue Mediterranean Sea is on your left and high mountains are on your right. The bus lets you off in a lovely park across from the sea. Stroll along the Promenade de la Croisette, stop at an open-air caf√© or shop along palm-lined boulevards. Swim in the Mediterranean or take a short bus ride to the red-clay mountains of the Corniche d’Esterel or to a restored castle turned art gallery in Mougins where Picasso found his inspiration.



Cannes has something to offer everyone. Your adventure begins with a walk along the Croisette which is a half-moon shaped harbor. Palm trees and blue and white striped beach umbrellas lead down to the sparkling water. The shops are elegant and the hotels are reminiscent of an era of wealth and charm. In the distance you see fabulous yachts bobbing in the water near the island where the "man in the iron mask" lived out his days in prison. As you walk down the promenade you come to "old town" and the cobbled stone streets lead to an ancient Abby high on a hill. As you walk upwards you will pass small outdoor cafes with delicious smells calling to you. Cannes (pronounced "can" by the locals) is the home of the International Film Festival where in May the town becomes host to the movie industries most elite members. Run up the staircase of the world's most famous steps of the "Palais des Festival."



It's not just by chance that the Great and Good of this world have, since the mid eighteenth Century, chose Cannes as their holiday resort. What other city can offer, all year round, such beautiful light, such a harmonious union of sea shores and wooded mountain, dazzling gardens suspended between the blue sea and the azure sky? The Romans settled here, Napoleon admired the town on his return from Elba and Lord Brougham, former Chancellor of England, built a magnificent residence in Cannes. Millionaires, artists, writers and poets have confirmed its reputation. The warmth of its welcome and its Provencal roots make it a perfect holiday destination.

Friday, September 22, 2006

Red Rock of Sedona

Arizona's Majestic Sedona

Sedona, Arizona is the perfect trip if you are looking for stunning views of giant red sandstone that reach to the blue sky. Sedona's natural beauty is enhanced by the wonderful town which lives under is compelling peaks. Sedona's is rich with diverse cultural events, spiritual energy, cozy bed and breakfasts, world-class resorts and spas, great golf, eclectic art galleries and exquisite cuisine. Small wonder Sedona, draws nearly 4 millions tourists each year.

Just an easy drive (110 miles) north of Phoenix, Sedona has cornered the market on amazing beauty. It is a place to sit and marvel. The Red Rocks have a vibrant, magical hue and seem to glow within. There is a strong belief that Sedona is home to several vortexes, or specific focal points of the earth's energy so many travel to feel the renewal of energy in their own life. Sedona was named The Most Beautiful Place in America in USA Weekend's Annual Travel Report.

Situated at the base of Mogollon Rim, a geologically dominating structure of limestone, mudstone and sandstone, Sedona is engulfed by extraordinary monoliths resembling distinctive objects that bear their name. Cathedral Rock, Coffee Pot, Bell and Snoopy to name a few. Hollywood saw the potenial of the dramatic scenery and was drawn to Sedona as early as 1920 with the filming of Zane Grey's "Call of the Canyon." Many films followed, as did movie stars from those eras including Gene Autry, Henry Fonda, Rock Hudson, Elvis Presley, John Wayne and Robert DeNiro. Many other attractions are a short trip away. The dramatic Grand Canyon is less than two hours away, scenic Flagstaff, Arizona is about a thirty minute drive north, historic Prescott is just south and ninety minutes south in the Valley of the Sun.


Despite its small population of 10,400 Sedona is classified as a world-class destination. One can discover so much by wandering through the quaint courtyards of a gorgeous Mexican Village named Tlaquepaque, and Indian name meaning "the best of everything." Amongst the cobblestone and fountains visitors enjoy gift boutiques, art galleries (there are over 40 in all of Sedona) and intimate restaurants. Sedona's downtown boasts quaint shops, friendly local cafes with stunning views of the red rocks from every angle, giving a whole new meaning to the term "window shopping." Sedona stays in your heart and you will want to return again and again.

Sunday, August 27, 2006

Halifax Holiday

Enjoy Halifax History and Beauty

Halifax, the capital region of Nova Scotia, Canada, is a lively and colorful combination of urban and rural living at its best. Beautiful flowers bloom as you drive down cobblestone streets that lead to the harbor. It is such a wonderful city to discover with its old town feel.

Halifax history dates back to 1749 when Governor Edward Cornwallis and 2500 settlers created Canada's first permanent British town, on the scenic shores of the world's second largest natural harbor. The historic downtown waterfront areas of Halifax are great for adventure walking. This is the city where the Titanic survivors were brought and those, not so fortunate, are buried.

Halifax has had a dramatic and tragic history where in 1917 half the town was destroyed by a blast in the harbor when 11 thousand were killed or injured. Beyond the harbor, you must take the special trip to Peggy's Cove which displays a beautiful lighthouse. On the trip there you will see amazing rocks that seem to be thrown by God on the shore. I have never seen anything like it. Out from Peggy's Cove is the beautiful monument honoring the final resting place of Swissair 111.

Take a trip to Halifax for a lovely treat. Hotels are plentiful that look out on the water or take a boat ride through this amazing harbor. The people are so kind and generous. Casinos are everywhere as well as terrific restaurants. Halifax is just what you need for seeing the best the world has to offer.

Tuesday, August 01, 2006

Visit the peaceful fields of Shakertown, Ky

An interesting footnote in history is the society of Believers in Christs Second Coming known as the Shakers. They were a group who derived from a small branch of English Quakers who had adopted some of the tenants followed by the 'French Prophets.' Their name comes from a description of Shaking Quakers, which refered to their practice of trembling, shouting, dancing, shaking, singing, and speaking in a strange language. The first documented use of the term comes from a British newspaper reporter who wrote in 1758 that the worshippers rolled on the floor and spoke in tongues.

In America, this quiet group began a community in 1805 in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, also known as Shakertown, near the Kentucky River. The community which believed in separation of the sexes eventually reached a population of about 500 by adopting orphans and conversions. It was disbanded in 1910 and the last Shaker resident died in 1923.

Much of the land and many of the buildings were restored as a museum known as Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill. It is an interesting step back in time to see the old buildings and look at the famous Shaker furniture.

Their mottos ranged from "Do your work as though you had a thousand years to live and as if you were to die tomorrow” and "Put your hands to work, and your heart to God." Shakers were known for a style of furniture, known as Shaker furniture. It was plain in style, durable, and functional.

Shaker chairs were usually mass-produced since a great number of them were needed to seat all the Shakers in a community. Because of the quality of their craftsmanship, original Shaker furniture is expensive. One original Shaker stool sold for just under $100,000.

This is some of the most beautiful land in Kentucky that you will ever visit.

Take time to enjoy a dinner of Shaker hospitality and their famous healthy food. It is a wonderful retreat from modern life to visit Shakertown and one you’ll remember as a peaceful step into history.

America is beautiful

The Grand Tetons of Wyoming



As summer winds down, don’t miss out on seeing the magnificent West. One of the most overwhelming landscapes you will ever behold is Grand Teton National Park. The magnificent mountain range captures your heart as you enter. The tremendous peaks with their snow-capped glory inspire awe. Thankfully hotels and waffle houses do not mar the view. It remains as it was when the wagon trains passed through its canyons.



There are many different kinds of plants and animals located in Grand Teton National Park. The best time to see animals is early morning just before the sun peeks over the Teton Mountain Range and at dusk. Most animals can be seen near water, especially Moose. The Snake River flows from its headwater throughout Yellowstone National Park then south through Jackson Hole. Grand Teton National Park is not only famous for its beautiful scenery, but also for the hiking trails. Most of the trails are very accessible, vary in length, and have a variety of difficulty levels ranging from an easy walk to a technical climb.



One great way to experience Grand Teton National Park and its lakes is to take a boat ride across Jenny Lake to the mouth of Cascade Canyon. This classic U-shaped canyon, was carved by one of the most recent glaciers to flow east from the Teton Range. An active glacier can be seen from Jenny Lake on the north side of Mount Owen. A short hike will lead you to Hidden Falls and further on is Inspiration Point. String Lake and Leigh Lake, just to the north of Jenny Lake, are ideal for a day of canoeing or kayaking. The beauty in the towering mountains from the water's vantage is awe-inspiring. The splendor of Jenny Lake with its clear water and smooth stones is impossible to describe. You will just have to go!

Tuesday, July 25, 2006

The Grand Tetons of Wyoming

As summer winds down, don’t miss out on seeing the magnificent West. One of the most overwhelming landscapes you will ever behold is Grand Teton National Park. The magnificent mountain range captures your heart as you enter. The tremendous peaks with their snow-capped glory inspire awe. Thankfully hotels and waffle houses do not mar the view. It remains as it was when the wagon trains passed through its canyons.

There are many different kinds of plants and animals located in Grand Teton National Park. The best time to see animals is early morning just before the sun peeks over the Teton Mountain Range and at dusk. Most animals can be seen near water, especially Moose. The Snake River flows from its headwater throughout Yellowstone National Park then south through Jackson Hole. Grand Teton National Park is not only famous for its beautiful scenery, but also for the hiking trails. Most of the trails are very accessible, vary in length, and have a variety of difficulty levels ranging from an easy walk to a technical climb.

One great way to experience Grand Teton National Park and its lakes is to take a boat ride across Jenny Lake to the mouth of Cascade Canyon. This classic U-shaped canyon, was carved by one of the most recent glaciers to flow east from the Teton Range. An active glacier can be seen from Jenny Lake on the north side of Mount Owen. A short hike will lead you to Hidden Falls and further on is Inspiration Point. String Lake and Leigh Lake, just to the north of Jenny Lake, are ideal for a day of canoeing or kayaking. The beauty in the towering mountains from the water's vantage is awe-inspiring. The splendor of Jenny Lake with its clear water and smooth stones is impossible to describe. You will just have to go!

Friday, July 07, 2006

Explore History and Ghosts in Charleston

Charleston Adventure

Visiting Charleston is like stepping into an antique movie set with pristine historic atmosphere.  This glorious city is an American treasure of southern history.  Charles Town was named in honor of King Charles II of England. King Charles was known for his womanizing and a lifestyle as a pleasure seeker. It has been said the King Charles was "the father of his people, or at least, a great many of them." Founded in 1670, early settlers established the new town which amazingly, by 1690, was America's fifth largest city.  Charles Town became one of the largest and wealthiest cities in America as the result of the trading of indigo and rice.  Initially, the population consisted mostly of English settlers, and later added many French Protestants called "Huguenots" as well as Irish.

 

Early Charles Town suffered a serious threat by murderous and thieving pirates, most notably Blackbeard.  Also threatened by Spaniards and Indians, it didn't take long for resentment to build against the English Lord Proprietors who were neither willing nor able to protect Charles Town from attacks. Revolutionary activity began in Charles Town as early as 1719.

 

It is interesting to walk the original streets of peninsular Charles Town. A good many of the original 17th and 18th century structures were destroyed in one of the many fires Charles Town endured, many of which were caused by military sieges by the British and later by the Union Army.

 

Much of Charleston’s past is neatly located on a peninsula, and there are lots of ways to experience it, from walking tours to carriage rides, ghost walks and boat tours. Charleston’s tour guides are highly trained and most have a background in history and many have written books.

The ghost tours add drama to evening walks.  Stories of hauntings such as Lavinia, the first woman to be hung in South Carolina, after she and her husband coolly murdered a number of unsuspecting house guests, or of several of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, who were imprisoned in the dungeon under the Old Provost Jail, or of Blackbeard’s pirates, who were hung over nearby creeks as a warning to their shipmates.  The tour is filled with stories of resident ghosts, haunted inns, Gullah superstitions, and assorted other ghost stories from Charleston's haunted history and has been featured on CNN.


Plantation tours are a great way to experience the charm of Charleston. They're about a 30-minute drive from the city and you'll want to give yourself several hours to enjoy them. Middleton Place is a elegant choice and includes a restaurant and inn.


Charleston's historic homes are the city’s greatest attraction. Many homes in Peachtree City were modeled from the beautiful Charleston architecture.  A carriage ride will take you through Charleston's historic neighborhoods with the clip clop on the pavement of the horse drawn carriage as it ambles slowly down the charming and celebrated avenues. Motor Tours are two hours, and typically include a stop at "The Battery" so you can take in the beautiful view of Charleston Harbor.

Charleston can also be enjoyed by boat in a variety of ways. Fort Sumter Tours leave from either the new Wharf area or Patriots Point in Mount Pleasant. Also consider the romantic Charleston Dinner Cruise offered by Spirit Line Cruises or Charleston Harbor Tours is a excellent choice to enjoy Charleston from the harbor or you may want to book a private dinner cruise for group.

Call for more information or to book your reservation call 866-550-8939.

 

Thursday, June 22, 2006

Beatle Week in Liverpool

All you need is love” of the Beatles!

Don’ t miss the fun of International Beatle Week in Liverpool this year. Celebrate the music of The Beatles in the town where they were born.

Fans from across the globe come together in Liverpool to experience the Fab Four’s music being performed by over 50 of the world’s best tribute bands. Other attractions over the week include auctions, markets, videos, tours and interviews with people that knew and worked with The Beatles.

Liverpool is a wonderful city with charm all its own and, of course, if you are a Beatle fan, it already has a special place in your heart. There is so much to do. Don’t forget the interesting places to visit while you are there — Take a Ferry ‘Cross The Mersey, see the Beatles Story at the Albert Dock, the John Lennon Mathew Street Gallery, The Magical Mystery Tour, the Beatles art show at St Georges Hall, and the Cavern Club where it all started.

The Beatles are the most successful band in the history of pop music, even though they last played together over 30 years ago. Their greatest hits album The Beatles 1, released in November 2000, sold almost 30 million copies worldwide, topped the album chart in 30 countries and was certified platinum over 100 times. It was just five years between the release of their debut single ‘Love me Do’ and their critically acclaimed album ‘Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band’.

The Beatle Fest will be held August 23-29th. Packages are available inclusive of shows and accommodation or simply buy individual tickets for specific shows. Telephone: +44 (0) 151 236

Thursday, June 08, 2006

A Touch of England to the North

If you are thinking of getting out of the southern heat, go north to the beautiful city of VICTORIA in Canada. As you arrive by ferry, you’ll find why it has been voted one of the world’s top-ten cities to visit according to travel magazine Cond√© Nast Traveler. After a day of walking the narrow cobblestone streets, you may have an irresistible urge for high tea in the afternoon! Named after the famous queen, it has an undeniably quaint English feel. Kipling called it "Brighton Pavilion with the Himalayas for a backdrop." Victoria has more British-born residents than anywhere in Canada. Flowers hang everywhere and lush parks are perfect for restoring your soul. Outside the city is the most amazing place called Butchart Gardens that delight with flowers from around the world. Located next to the Pacific, Butchart Gardens allows you to wander for hours and appreciate the vistas and unparallel beauty. There are Fifty-five acres of wonderful floral displays open to the public, offering spectacular views from the many paths that meander through the four main gardens. From the exquisite Sunken Garden to the charming Rose Garden, the gracious traditions of the past are still maintained in one of the loveliest corners in the world. From Victoria you can also take a tour boat out to watch pods of Killer Whales as they swim around the island. Memories of Victoria always delight!

Friday, June 02, 2006

Summer Water Fun on the Toccoa River

It is an amazing adventure to float down a river. Getting back to nature is the perfect way to enjoy the summer. The Toccoa River is perfect for those people who just want to relax and enjoy the gentle flow of the water. This river is actually the headwaters of Tennessee’s Ocoee River but changes its name to the Toccoa when it crosses the line into Georgia.

Colorful inner tubes, kayaks and canoes provide a cool and refreshing way to have fun and relax on a hot summer day on the Toccoa River. Our colorful vinyl inner tubes with handles are designed for your comfort. We do not use black tire tubes which can get very hot and uncomfortable in the sun. We also offer "snuggle tubes" which carry two people.

The Toccoa is a dam-controlled river and TVA releases water daily. Water levels and speed can change significantly after water is released. At low water, the river is shallower and moves at approximately 1 mile per hour. At high water (after water is released at Blue Ridge dam) the river rises 2 to 3 feet and moves at approximately 5 miles per hour. River release is controlled by TVA and is subject to change without notice.

The depth of the water changes from place to place in the river and there may be small rapids and rocks along the way. This trip is suitable for most people who can swim but there is risk associated with all water related activities and you will be required to sign a waiver of liability prior to beginning your river trip. For a great trip to North Georgia, why not enjoy a day of rafting?

For a fun trip try:

800-408-7238
rafting@rollingthunderriverco.com

Monday, May 29, 2006

Summer in the Majesty of Montana’s Largest Lake

This summer be swept away by the beauty of Flathead Lake in northwest Montana, a destination of nationally protected recreational treasures, which fosters the human delight in play and creativity.

The Valley lies in the heart of the Rocky Mountains wild lands between the Salish Mountains to the west, and the Whitefish, Swan and Mission Ranges, rising to the continental divide, to the east. Have a look at the relief map to get an idea of the contrast of the valley floor to the surrounding mountains. These are no gentle inclines, but sudden, towering slopes that provide a very definite sense of place for the townships below.

The Valley is watered by the vast Flathead Lake and moisture falling west of the continental divide. With the lake to the south, and mountain ranges protecting the other three sides, the Flathead's climate is surprisingly mild for an area so far north. In its nurturing microclimates the Valley grows a variety of crops that distinguish it from the grain and stock mainstays of central and eastern Montana. Meander along country byways to find peppermint, Christmas trees, cherries, champagne grapes (stop in at Mission Mountain Winery), as well as barley, wheat, oats and potatoes. Flathead National Forest and the Flathead Indian Reservation encircle this patchwork agriculture.

Flathead Valley is the western gateway to Glacier National Park, one of the jewels in the crown of the national park system. The valley also lies adjacent to more than 1.7 million acres of federal wilderness in the form of the Great Bear - Bob Marshall Wilderness complex. Other nature highlights include the National Bison Range and the Jewel Basin Hiking Area.

Conditions on the rivers and lakes of the Flathead Valley range from placid water of Ashley Creek to raging whitewater. Among the popular whitewater runs are the Middle Fork of the Flathead River near West Glacier, and the North Fork of the Flathead north of Columbia Falls. Divers have been plying local waters for years. Almost all local dives require full wet- or dry-suit protection because of the cold water.

With terrific natural recreation resources in abundance, Flathead Valley is very tourist-oriented, and provides a host of things to do and places to stay. A fun way to get a great view is to take the gondola to the top of the mountain at Big Mountain Ski Resort, which offers both summer and winter-time activities. The Valley boasts eight championship golf courses offering a season from April though October. Publicly owned courses feature impressive log cabin clubhouses, built 50 years ago by Depression-era loggers under the direction of the federal Works Project Administration. Book tee times in advance through the Flathead Valley Golf Association. Within the Valley area you will also find 200 miles of groomed snowmobile trails, world class hunting, indoor and outdoor tennis, swimming and health facilities.

Thriving Art Communities
The Valley is not just the domain of sport enthusiasts. Flathead has more than its share of creative types who have found in the Valley an environment and community conducive to creating works of art. Their work can be seen in studios, galleries and other outlets throughout the Valley, particularly in Bigfork and Kalispell. Other cultural highlights include Conrad Mansion, St Ignatius Mission and the Museum of the Plains Indians.

For a great Flathead Adventure vacation try:

http://www.averills.com/

Sunday, May 21, 2006

Jamestown Colony Turns 400

Now is the time to travel to Jamestown, VA!

In May 2006, Jamestown begins its countdown to the fort’s 400-year-old birthday. This is such an exciting place to take children on vacation.

Touching history is easy at Jamestown. In June of 1606, King James I granted a charter to a group of London entrepreneurs to establish a satellite English settlement in the Chesapeake region of North America. By December, 108 settlers sailed from London instructed to settle Virginia, find gold and a water route to the Orient. The fort, boats, and the authentic settlers make it a perfect place to learn and enjoy.

Take a step back in time as the replica of the ship, the Godspeed sails from the Chesapeake Bay up the James River re-creating parts of the original route sailed almost 400 years ago. Godspeed, one of the three original ships that in 1607 brought America's first permanent English colonists to Jamestown, our nation's birthplace, and will serve as a floating museum for families, students and tens of thousands of visitors.

Come and explore a sampling of 17th -century America. Visitors will be welcome aboard as she docks and enjoy the festivities, music, art and cultural activities. Enjoy America’s unique heritage!

2006 GODSPEED SAIL

When:

Ports of call begin May 27 through July 2006

Time:
11 a.m. – 7 p.m. weekdays; *
11 a.m. – 8 p.m. weekends and holidays*
(Fri-Sun, + May 29th and July 3)

Where: Alexandria, VA. - May 27 through June 3
(Founders Park/Torpedo Factory/City Marina/Waterfront Park)

Baltimore, Md. - June 9 through June 12
(Baltimore Inner Harbor- 401 Light Street is the main entrance)

Philadelphia, Pa. - June 16 through June 19
(The Great Plaza at Penn's Landing- Columbus Blvd. at Market Street)

New York, NY. - June 27 through July 6
(South Street Seaport Museum's Pier 16- South Street at Fulton Street)

Boston, Mass. - July 14 through July 19
(John Joseph Moakley U.S. Courthouse- 1 Courthouse Way and adjacent Fan Pier)

Newport RI. - July 25 through July 30
(Newport Yachting Center- America's Cup Avenue at 4 Commercial Wharf)

*Public Hours noon to 8:00 p.m.

Cost: Free admission to all events and activities

Friday, April 21, 2006

Wagon Train Adventure

What’s that sound? Indians are attacking the wagon train! Adventure in the Yellowstone takes on a new meaning when you sign on for a wagon train ride. As the Indians whirled around us, our eyes were bright with excitement. Morgan, my son, and I had decided to get out of town. He was 9 and I longed for an adventure that didn’t involve roller coasters.

We had signed on for a 5-day Wagon Train through the Tetons of Wyoming into the silence forest and mountains of the Yellowstone. Our group had been riding in the wagon half the day when the Indians arrived. They whooped and brandishing guns as they galloped their painted horses around us. I couldn’t stop laughing, but Morgan wasn’t sure if he had to defend us or just enjoy it. As the Indians jumped off their horses they offer the wagon train pioneers a decorative peace pipe and we all sat down to a campfire dinner. After dinner we were handed our tents. Morgan and I struggled with the process until I begged one of the cowboy’s assistance. With a little training, we got the hang of it.

Our group was from all over America and even a family from Switzerland. We blended in with the group and listened late into the night to the cowboy songs floating over the wind. It had always been a secret dream to go on a wagon train as the pioneers had done and I slept great even though we had been warned of bears and scorpions.

The next morning we trudged in our boots and hats to the chuck wagon for breakfast. Today we would ride horses into the timbers of tall sweet smelling pine.

High into the hills we came upon a small lake with two white swans drifting over the blue reflecting pool.

Everywhere we looked was absolutely breathtaking. I couldn’t stop smiling. That night a mountain man arrived and we were treated to stories of the old West and the kids were allowed to try to hold the heavy musket. As the following day dawned, I saw taller mountains and the horses strained to haul the wagons upward to our next camp.

When we rested at lunch, some of the group scouted out the high cliffs where Morgan and I saw phenomenal canyons and peaks. As we got back to camp the Pony Express rider was just galloping around the corner.

What fun! Adventure vacations with kids can be a special lasting memory. For more information you might try:

TETON WAGON TRAIN & HORSE ADVENTURE
DOUBLE H BAR, INC.
Jackson Hole, Wyoming 83002-0307
1-888-734-6101
or (307) 734-6101
FAX (208) 787-3435

http://www.tetonwagontrain.com/

Thursday, April 06, 2006

Traveling Time - Coming Soon!

Angie McCarl is going to give us the scoop on traveling! Planning a trip with your children? She'll give you some tips on where to go and how to do it best. Watch here for Angie's informative and fun column soon!